The ‘no plan’ media plan

As we came out of April we would usually be thinking about media plans for June; as a short term agency we don’t tend to plan too much ahead so are used to working short term. This year however, we are looking at May and forecasting for Q3 has gone completely out of the window. This is the ‘no plan media plan’: no commitment, no budgets, no pressure and I quite like it.

Every client is in a unique situation right now, all have challenges (some greater than others) but there are opportunities too.  We have found that by taking each week (and sometimes each day) one at time, we can maintain a steady flow of spend, look at results as they come in and make a decision about what to do tomorrow based on these.

So how did April shape up? Some clients have had to fully exercise the furlough scheme as it makes no sense for them to try to operate in the current market, so they are ‘on hold’ but actually still receiving a steady flow of interest for when they can function again.  Others have remained fully functioning as a business, despite not being able to sell, and used the time to ‘tidy the classroom at the end of term’ poised in a very strong position to hit the ground running as soon as they can.  We are still running ads in their key titles at much reduced rates to maintain momentum.

Finally, we have the ‘operators’ –  those who have been able to function (albeit with some adaptions and restrictions) with staff working from home, factories running with half capacity, deliveries no longer being signed for and people’s acceptance that delivery does not have to happen the next day.  For some the main issue has been stock: things selling too well and reduced ability to re-stock; but for a number of our clients we have seen our best ever results from individual ads.  With buying rates at rock bottom, circulations still strong and engagement still high it is very much possible to get amazing results from advertising.

So what about May?

With some lifting of lockdown what will be the impact?  I don’t know – but I do believe that the majority of people will still favour mail order over standing in a queue outside a shop, 2m apart, 1 person at a time. Socially distanced shopping will remain only for those shopping for necessities or for those who have a really strong desire to obtain something particular – there is no real  pleasure to be gained from retail shopping for the foreseeable future.  Beyond that we will continue to monitor daily as the responses and the deals come in – the beauty of direct response is you get to see exactly what your £1 spent has generated so you can justify (or not) the next ad.

So no predictions for the future just yet – except perhaps a baby boom in the New Year – as among the busiest websites currently (gardening, home learning and DIY) are Love Honey, whose sales are doing particularly well during the enforced ‘stay at home’!

Alice Buttling, MD & Media Director

 

Targeting the mature market but not on TV yet?

If you are spending monthly budgets for £25k+ in newspapers & magazines with products that target the mature market then TV is a great addition to your schedule.

The 65+ market are high consumers of daytime TV, so how can you tap into this potentially lucrative audience?

As always we take a considered and results-driven approach. We can see what’s working with an initial learning phase, at low risk to you, by carefully selecting the right channels from the wide variety of channels available. Application of this knowledge is vital if you want to make your budget work as effectively as possible.  The programming in daytime is low engagement so response rates are higher, and due to the wide variety of channels available you can select the channels with lower viewing figures to make it low risk during the learning phase.

Many agencies buy TV as a package of channels, the sales house bundles channels together and you agree a budget across these channels, but they can weight the delivery by channel to suit their inventory.  This is fine for branding and products with a very broad audience, but if you are going for a niche audience (like 65+) then there is too much wastage for this approach to be efficient.

For example the UKTV channels would include Drama, Alibi, Yesterday, Home, Really, Gold, Eden (all good for 65+) but also Goodfood, W, Dave (not good for 65+) – the same would be true of the Sky packages. By selecting only the top ranking channels you increase the chances of success and maximise your audience. AJ’s strategy ensures that the budget works to suit your business, not the agendas of the sales houses.

Adults 65+ view TV mainly in a comfort, unwind or In Touch state

The states typified by the 65+ audience and indeed the programming within them, are conducive to response; for comfort and unwind they are in relax mode, the content is low engagement and easy to view and for In Touch it is news, current affairs and documentaries – again programmes that are easy to interrupt and to act on an ad.

In contrast, the higher states for a younger audience are distract and indulge, which include series and movies which are highly engaging.

Target Channel Group … A65+ IMPACTS (R/W) A16+ IMPACTS (R/W) Proportion of 65+ viewers
A65+ Total 69,619,061.02 196,041,963.86 35.5%

The stats above show the % of viewing impacts that are 65+ as 35%, the 65+ population is 23% therefore there is a positive index of 152 so a very strong market to get targeting through this medium.

Attinger Jack can help you approach TV on a low-risk, test basis. Every channel on your schedule would be chosen purely to deliver the best results for your business and not for any other reason.